Comings and Goings: Bebley, Dhupelia, Kucia, DeNard

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Two central office administrators have announced their departure.

James Bebley

James Bebley

James Bebley, who’s served as CPS general counsel the last three years, announced his retirement at Wednesday’s Board of Education meeting. Prior to becoming the district’s top legal advisor, he served for nine years in the law department’s No. 2 slot as first deputy general counsel. Before coming to CPS, Bebly worked in private practice, in the city’s law department and as a deputy chief of staff in the mayor’s office.

Aarti Dhupelia, who has led much of the district’s college-going work in recent years, is leaving CPS for a post at National Louis University, where she will be the university’s vice president of strategic initiatives and oversee the new Harrison Professional Pathways program.

Aarti Dhupelia

Aarti Dhupelia

She told WBEZ earlier this week that her new role is “really an extension of the work I’ve been doing in CPS, because I’ve really been focused on how do we prepare students to be successful in college, career and life.” Her CPS roles have been chief officer for the Office of College and Career Success and deputy chief of staff for the CEO and she oversaw the district’s work related to discipline and chronic absenteeism.

Catalyst confirmed Friday afternoon that Alan Mather, the principal at Lindblom Math and Science Academy, will succeed Dhupelia. Mather has led the selective-enrollment high school in Englewood since it reopened in 2005. He was named the first Golden Apple principal last year.

The School Board also approved new administrative hires on Wednesday, several of whom worked with new CEO Forrest Claypool at the Chicago Transit Authority.

Ronald DeNard was approved as senior vice president of finance. DeNard will earn a $225,000-a-year salary and receive a two-year waiver from the district’s policy that requires employees to live in the city. The School Board reclassified the role as a “special needs position” to allow him to qualify. A CPS spokesman told the Tribune DeNard “has a unique set of skills honed at financially troubled organizations — skills needed at this time of fiscal crisis at Chicago Public Schools.” DeNard previously served as the CTA’s chief financial officer.

Doug Kucia, was formally approved as Claypool’s chief of staff, with a salary of $175,000. Kucia was Claypool’s chief of staff at the CTA and when Claypool served as a Cook County commissioner.

Andrell Holloway was approved as chief internal auditor, with a salary of $191,000. Holloway previously worked in the same capacity at the CTA.

Pedro Soto was appointed chief of school operations, with a salary of $150,000, up from the $115,000 he earned as chief of staff in the district’s network support office. Recently, the district tried to get the United Neighborhood Organization and the UNO Charter School Network to merge and let Soto lead the charter schools, the Sun-Times reports. But the UCSN board voted against the move.

Arnaldo (Arnie) Rivera was approved as chief policy officer, up from acting chief policy officer, a role in which he will earn $170,000 a year. He previously served as the deputy chief of staff for education in the mayor’s office, the deputy chief of staff for the CEO at CPS and the chief operating officer at the Chicago Public Education Fund.

Marilyn Rhames has moved her blogging from Education Week to Education Post, the new communications nonprofit that promotes a middle path through policy extremes.  She is a former journalist who has taught in CPS charter and district-run schools. She now works at a K-8 Chicago charter school supporting alumni as they move on to high school, college and careers.

Robert Muller was appointed the new dean at the National College of Education at National Louis University, a role in which he will oversee the college’s curriculum, staffing, student affairs and budget. Muller previously served as the director of strategy and business development at SRI Education and is a former deputy assistant secretary for vocational and adult education in the U.S. Department of Education.

Six educators have obtained four-year contracts as principals at new schools. Denise Lynch was selected as principal at Finkl Elementary after serving as principal at Marsh Elementary.

Noel McNally is leading Vaugh High School after serving as principal at Byrne Elementary.

Allania Moore became principal at Madison Elementary after working as assistant principal at Jefferson High School.

Gilberto Piedrahita is serving as principal at Jordan Elementary after working as assistant principal at Saucedo Elementary.

Rocio Rosales became principal at Nathan Davis Elementary after serving as a teacher at Daley Elementary.

Sharrone Travis is the new principal at James Thorp Elementary after serving as assistant principal at Till Math and Science Academy.

Two assistant principals are moving up to principal at their schools. Eileen Considine is now principal at Columbia Explorers Elementary and Terrycita Perry became principal at Dixon Elementary.

Four interim principals have been retained as contract principals: Adrian Dobbins at Field Elementary; Michael Hinton at Hoyne Elementary; Elizabeth Meyers at Randolph Elementary; and Michael Biela at Rickover Naval Academy. Charles Smith has become the contract principal, up from acting principal, at Infinity High School.

  • Concerned Parent

    Mather towed the line – shame one has to escape from being a principal.

  • Concerned Parent

    At Linblom HS-how many REACH teacher evaluations were completed for the last two years there?

  • Concerned Parent

    watch for favoritism to Kenwood with Kirby appointment and increase in her pay. Another administration without evaluation of network chiefs by principals. She comes to chiefs as their colleague.

  • xian

    You miss labelled Education Post. It is not a “middle ground” organization. It is a 12 million dollar non-profit funded by partisan extremist foundations. It has come out strongly against neighborhood schools, community choice in assessment and the Dyett Hunger Strike.

    It often tasks staffers to flood comments of places like Catalyst with a particular perspective.

    Marilyn is great. I wish her continued good fortune.