Austin report card

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Aftershock

In the 1970s, white flight and disinvestment took a toll on Austin. Yet, today, the area is a beehive of activism focused on affordable housing, job opportunity and helping those released from prison reconnect with the community. One in three children in Austin live in poverty; 84 percent attend public schools.

Neighborhood snapshot
Austin

Chicago

Students in private school
14%

18%

Population 25 and over w/ high school diploma
68%

72%

Median household income
$33,975

$38,600

Children below poverty level
32%

29%

Unemployment rate
17%

10%

Residents living in own homes
47%

48%

Average sale price (single family residence)
$213,699

$331,715

Median rent (per month)
$588

$616

Source: Census 2000; Average sale price from Multiple Listing Service of Northern Illinois, Oct. 1, 2005 to Sept. 30 2006.

Who schools serve

Public schools in Austin are overwhelmingly poor and African-American. Only one school, Sayre Elementary, serves a sizable population of children from middle-income families; and only G. Clark reports more than 10 percent of students are English language learners. May Elementary posts a shocking mobility rate: Nearly half of its student body left or transferred in mid-year in the 2004-05 school year.

Student population

Enrollment

Poverty

Bilingual

Mobility

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Armstrong, L.
196

96%

0%

41%

Brunson
813

88%

0%

35%

Clark, G.
385

92%

12%

14%

DePriest
613

97%

1%

35%

Douglass Middle
902

99%

0%

31%

Ellington
474

98%

0%

27%

Emmet
688

97%

0%

37%

Hay
649

96%

1%

23%

Howe
798

98%

0%

30%

Leland
270

96%

0%

20%

Lewis
1059

89%

3%

26%

Lovett
669

79%

3%

17%

Key
461

96%

0%

22%

May
894

97%

0%

48%

McNair
667

92%

1%

33%

Nash
851

98%

0%

41%

Sayre
534

58%

7%

10%

Spencer
1128

91%

0%

38%

Young
1539

95%

3%

19%

HIGH SCHOOLS
Michele Clark
774

94%

0%

8%

Austin *
1032

91%

0%

31%

Note: Austin high school is being phased out; currently only seniors are enrolled.
Source: 2005 Illinois School Report Card, Ellington Elementary (mobility rate)

How schools are doing

In 2005, 3rd-graders at G. Clark posted the highest math scores; L. Armstrong’s did best in reading. By 8th grade, reading scores had improved, but pass rates in math had declined at nearly every school. Emmet Elementary was the exception.

Elementary Performance

ISAT math-3

ISAT math-8

ISAT read-3

ISAT read-8

Armstrong, L
67%

NA

67%

NA

Brunson
40%

NA

26%

NA

Clark, G.
81%

43%

65%

73%

DePriest
38

NA

23%

NA

Douglass Middle
NA

6%

NA

40%

Ellington
61

NA

39%

NA

Emmet
22

37%

31%

71%

Hay
29.5

NA

25%

NA

Howe
25

13%

21%

26%

Leland
74

NA

50%

NA

Lewis
30

18%

21%

59%

Lovett
33

21%

25%

44%

Key
33

NA

26%

NA

May
38

5%

29%

43%

McNair
22

NA

22%

NA

Nash
33%

12%

29%

40%

Sayre
51

45%

46%

71%

Spencer
35

18%

21%

33%

Young
51

10%

36%

46%

High school performance*

Graduation

Dropout

PSAE math

PSAE reading

Michele Clark
N/A

4%

14%

42%

Austin
65%

15%

3%

12%

*Note: Michele Clark, formerly a middle school, did not have a graduating class in 2005. The school added its first 9 th-grade class in 2002 and now serves grades 6-12. Austin high school is being phased out; currently only seniors are enrolled.
Source: 2005 Illinois School Report Card