Helping students cope

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A number of resources aimed at parents and teachers provide information on helping children cope with the recent terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. The following are available on the Internet:

U.S. Department of Education

Suggestions for principals and teachers on how to make students feel safe at school.

www.ed.gov/inits/september11/educators.html

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

On its Disaster Mental Health Services page, there are tips on how to talk about disaster with children.

www.mentalhealth.org/cmhs/emergencyservices

National Institute of Mental Health

Helping Children & Adolescents Cope with Violence and Disasters includes a list of behaviors that are related to trauma, and suggestions on how to intervene.

www.nimh.nih.gov/publicat/violence.cfm

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

A Disaster Response kit, in English and in Spanish, on how to talk to children and parents about the attacks.

www.aacap.org

Association for Library Service to Children

ALSC, a division of the American Library Association, compiled a list of books on dealing with grief, links to helpful websites, and other materials aimed at parents, teachers and caregivers.

www.ala.org/alsc/dealing_with_tragedy.html

University of Minnesota Extension Service

Offers resources on racial and cultural awareness, helping children understand Islam and disaster relief.

www.extension.umn.edu/administrative/disasterresponse/terrorism.html

Nemours Foundation’s Center for Children’s Health Media

KidsHealth web page contains articles for parents, teachers, kids and teens explaining how to deal with the attack, and where to go to help others.

www.kidshealth.org/misc_pages/P_squarebanner.html

National Association of School Psychologists

A list of free resources for schools, families and communities.

www.nasponline.org/NEAT?crisis_0911.html

Sesame Street Parents

Articles on how to talk to your child.

www.sesameworkshop.org/parents/advice/article/0,4125,49560,00.html

Tragedy Becomes a Learning Experience

PBS offers teachers videos and lesson plans for different age ranges. For older students, the materials focus on the relationship between the United States and the Middle East, the history of Afghanistan and understanding how the United States combats terrorism. For younger students, the lessons cover diversity and understanding human rights.

www.pbs.org/americaresponds/educators.html

New York Times Learning Network

They have created lesson plans for students in grades 6-8 and grades 9-12 that combine the newspaper’s coverage of the attack, journal-writing and classroom discussion.

www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/lessons/20010912wednesday.html

National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education

They have compiled a number of resources to promote cultural understanding. Information is available in three categories: Middle East, Islam and Arab Americans; helping children cope with violence and death; and challenging stereotypes, intolerance and racism.

www.ncbe.gwu.edu/library/tolerance.htm

What Kids Can Do

They have articles on the actions children took in response to the attack and narratives by teenagers about how they felt.

www.whatkidscando.org/america.html

Where to Donate

American Red Cross posts news of its disaster-site relief efforts and counseling resources on its web site. Information is also available on how to make donations.

www.redcross.org

National Organization for Victim Assistance

They send crisis response teams to disaster sites to train local caregivers how to help victims. NOVA started a special fund for victims of the recent attack. Donations can be made online.

www.try-nova.org/index.html