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Former CPS CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett at the Jan. 28, 2015, board meeting.
Photo by Marc Monaghan
Former CPS CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett at the Jan. 28, 2015, board meeting.

Byrd-Bennett to plead guilty in kickback scheme

3 hours ago

Former CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett will plead guilty in a federal corruption case connected to the no-bid principal training contract for SUPES Academy. The federal case was launched as the result of a Catalyst investigation in 2013.

Every Tuesday, Jaqueline Espinal rides a shuttle to Truman College from Logan Square to take classes in childhood development.

City Colleges consolidation stirs concern about enrollment in child development programs

October 6, 2015

City Colleges of Chicago leaders say a plan to consolidate the child development program at Truman College on the North Side will lead to higher-quality offerings and stronger partnerships with four-year schools. But early childhood experts fear the move will limit access for students on the South and West Sides of the city, blocking pipeline development for bilingual teachers and educators of color.

Public hearings over proposals to open a dozen new charter schools take place tonight. File photo from a pro-charter school rally last year.

Co-locations major theme in charter proposals

September 30, 2015

Finances are a major motivator for making co-location a priority -- this year the district is not offering any financial assistance to help cover start-up costs. However, teachers at some of the schools being sought for co-locations worry they will have a negative impact on enrollment at their and other neighborhood schools.

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CTU Financial Secretary Kristine Mayle, a former special education teacher, speaks out against special education cuts at  a rally on Aug. 26, 2015.

Special ed cuts delayed amid sharp parent, teacher criticism

September 29, 2015

CPS officials said they wanted to clear up “misconceptions” about cuts to special education during Tuesday’s board meeting. But the opposite happened as parents, teachers and others repeatedly questioned the cash-strapped district’s ability to meet legal requirements for its most vulnerable students and railed against a new round of cuts unexpectedly announced last week.